VOGONS


First post, by Garrett W

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Greetings!

I have a Kingston TurboChip TC366 which used to house an AMD K6-2 366. As far as I can tell, this is a voltage regulator that runs in-between the board and CPU, so as to make sure that the correct voltage is applied. In the case of the K6-2, I believe that CPU required either 2.2v or 2.4V, where as MMX capable boards from that era usually supply 2.8V, maybe 2.7V. Not to mention boards that are incapable of dealing with split voltage and just do 3.3V-3.5V.
In any case, I've had this adapter for many years, but I have never made use of it or even tried it. I got my hands on an Olivetti M24 🤣 a few days ago which I upgraded from an MMX 166 to a 233, however I have a K6-2 450 that I've been thinking of plugging in, in the hopes that I can get it to work at 400, effectively maxing out the CPU for this system (with the possible exception of a K6-III or one of the plus models). The mainboard unfortunately can't do voltages lower than 2.8V, so I've been thinking of using the Kingston TurboChip adapter/regulator to do the hard work there.

Thing is, beneath the socket on the adapter/regulator is a set of 8 DIP switches without a map for the possible combinations. Tried as I might, I could not find any manual or explanation for these switches. Kingston's official manuals do not mention the DIP switches, I don't think they wanted end users removing the CPU from the adapter and only used them internally to configure for different products. The only clue I have is an IC next to the DIP switches which reads:
"f P86AB
RC5036M
A"

Unfortunately, I could not find any datasheets for this. I'm attaching two photos of the TurboChip in the hopes that someone can help me figure out the possible combinations.

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Reply 1 of 2, by BitWrangler

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I would say there's likely to be three multiplier switches, like on a motherboard, but overriding the motherboard ones, that go to the pins on the top CPU socket, and they are likely to have 10Kilohm resistors on them. Then there's likely to be 5 for setting voltage on that chip you see, which probably have a variety of different resistance values and work like voltage settings on a lot of motherboards. So if original docs are not to be had, you can bleep out the multi pins from a CPU pinout and figure out the voltage settings from the datasheet of the chip and the resistance values.

2017: Basement full of ancient PC stuff, starting to go through it. 2021: Still starting, heh, many setbacks. So what's this BitWrangler guy's deal ??? >>> Taming the pile, specs to target?

Reply 2 of 2, by snufkin

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I found a datasheet for the RC5036: https://www.datasheets360.com/pdf/635297678915034898

Page 9 has an example/refernce circuit, which Kingston may have followed and could be useful to work out what the switches connect to.